Kindergarten, Autism Worries and Moving On

It’s almost summer. My oldest will have his last days of Kindergarten next week. There will be a picnic day, movie day, signing autographs, and I am scared! I am so sad about it but also excited for him to move on, learn and grow. But for my youngest, G, I am just afraid that G will not be ready for Kindergarten on time. We decided G will go to ABA therapy full time, Monday through Friday, 9 to 3, starting in two weeks. He’ll do this all summer, and into this fall, if he seems to be happy and responding well. It’s really a lot so we may end up shortening a few of the days but we’ll see.

I just sent a message to one of the preschool teachers to let her know that we aren’t going to be able to come back. That was a message I was dreading to send. I wanted him to go back there so badly. I wanted a bigger piece of that dream of preschool and all the special moments there. It’s with tears in my eyes that I am saying: it’s done. He won’t go there again, and that’s that. This fall he will be at therapy, and next fall in 2020 he is supposed to go to Kindergarten. This next year is all about preparing him and figuring out what’s next. Inside, I am shaking. I want him to experience everything. I want to talk to him. I just want to talk to him. Without pointing, an app, without pictures.

G and I will visit the preschool this Thursday to get the picture that was on his cubby, say goodbye and give hugs. It’s the last day of school for the class he once was in. I am sure we will visit them again later in the year when G has hopefully made some huge, unbelievable milestones. Then I can cry happy tears and reconnect with them. That’s all I hope for.

My PSA: Take Control of Mental Health

I’ve still been on the research break I mentioned in my last post. I have tried to relax and enjoy the spring time with my family. On many days, I still feel a little helpless as soon as I wake up. A little lost but pushing on. My son is gaining more understanding all of the time but he still doesn’t talk and his theory of mind skills are growing slowly still. He is very much in his own world, on his time. There are no conversations of course, and not a lot of meaningful interaction with his brother. That has been the main sadness for me but I have learned to deal with my feelings and look at the big picture. Some of the biggest progress lately is that we can all ask him for a kiss and he will put his mouth on ours or our cheek. He also has been giving us tiny hugs around our waists or legs while we are standing. And for two weeks straight he has slept all night. I almost don’t want to write about it, in fear of jinxing it. Sometimes he might wake at 5 or 6 instead of 7, but he hasn’t been waking at 1 or 3 wanting water and seeming confused. He also falls asleep faster and without less fuss. This all gives me a big hope for his future.

Since turning 35 my gray hairs have definitely increased. They were probably sprouting anyway but I feel like it makes sense to add this to my story today. The past year has been the most filled. I felt like I was floating along a little. But then my husband had failed eye muscle surgeries, my mom is struggling with metastasized breast cancer and I live so far away, Liam started kindergarten which has brought out good things but he also is often anxious and worried (an all thinking and feeling person, wonder where he gets that from…) and Gavin has autism, still. I kept thinking it was going to slowly disappear and go away. Just like his older brother overcame some of his issues with social skills, I thought it will all happen for Gavin too. After all, we were doing so many good things.

It turns out that most things don’t just disappear once you get them.

There are things you can work on. There are things you can’t. 
Life is beautiful, but unfair.

Overall, it is easy for a lot of people to ignore the mental health problems in the world right now, unless it affects them personally. Or unless you are actively noticing it, like me. Sometimes it feels like a burden that I am seeing it and not quite sure what to do with it all. But I find it’s also keeping me alert and thinking. Add it makes this post possible today.

I live in Portland, Oregon, and I drive a lot every day. I see a lot of people just from inside my car as I putter down Powell Boulevard and 82nd Avenue. There are people with mental health issues who talk to themselves, wave their hands around to another person unseen, and do tricks as if they have an audience they can see. Whether these issues were brought on by drugs, toxins, or genetics, it is one of the most sad things to witness on the daily. I see some of the same individuals a few times a week who are walking no where in particular, over and over. I saw police officers place a reflective yellow vest on a woman who crosses the street a lot, mostly in places that are definitely not crosswalks. They must not have much else to offer for her except a yellow vest. A cover up to a bigger problem with no solution. I also see a woman who travels everywhere on a mobility scooter, her head hanging low because she can’t move it. Often people stop their car and push the crosswalk button for her because sometimes it looks like she wasn’t able to do it for a while. I will take a turn being that person one day, pushing the button.

I see older people in the grocery store with mental decline. They are looking at something on the shelf, just smiling at the boxes with big grins. Are they having a good memory, thinking of something happy? Or is it something else? There is never a dull moment wherever I go. Whenever I get a boost of happiness myself or a feeling of “normality” I see something again and then my mind begins to race about what’s going on with these people, and why? Of course, I am so aware of mental health so perhaps I see the signs of “things” more often. But I definitely know there are issues and want to know how to stop them. There is no reason for anyone to suffer mentally or physically if there could have been any possible way to prevent it.

Sometimes there is a physical trait that can tell you if someone may suffer from a mental abnormality. Gavin has been walking on his toes since he was about two years old. Sometimes if we are walking down the sidewalk he will stop for a while and walk “flatly” but most of the time he pops up on those little feet. It’s to the point to where I think his toes hurt sometimes. He has a new appointment next week to be evaluated for orthotics. I have mixed feelings about this. I know he likes to toe walk or simply just has a need to. I also notice other people toe walking now and I didn’t before. Just this week I noticed two women toe walking. One was on a sidewalk headed to a bus stop wearing black Converse shoes that laced up to her knees. Another woman was walking toward the grocery store entrance as I was leaving. Not only was she walking on her toes but she had her head turned to her right as she walked but her eyes were looking straight. I looked curiously right into hers and gave her a smile. But then I realized that she really was looking past me or she didn’t want to smile. It’s possible that both of these woman have zero problems with their mental health and just happen to toe walk or have an issue from having a stroke. But sometimes the symptom of toe walking does mean other things and it’s very individual on how one deals with it.

What would have happened if these two individuals wore orthotics in their shoes when they were little? Would their life be improved? Or did toe walking happen when they were adults? Do they have problems with their toes or feet now, or are they okay? There is no guidebook for me on any of this. I just observe and research in a perpetual spiral until I find my own answers.

Then I ask myself, at some point, will Gavin stop walking on his toes? Maybe something will click and it will just stop. I feel like when he is walking “normally” with me along the sidewalk that is actually focusing better and not thinking about “feeling” something in his feet. So part of me wants to try out orthotics to force his feet to stay flat and observe the way he acts during these times.

So back to noticing the mental health problem on a nearly daily basis: My husband and I were on a weekend trip. I didn’t notice anyone with a mental health problem in Hood River, Oregon. But when we took a detour on the way back to Portland, we stopped in a little town which I’ll just keep nameless. The only thing we did there was eat at a Mexican restaurant. It looked like the main talk of the town and it was busy with every kind of person from the area. Almost immediately after we sat down, I noticed a young man walk by the table and the corner of my eye noticed that his khaki pants were a little too short. I looked up and saw his face and knew. He was on a lunch trip with a few other young people like him with a caretaker. And again I thought how sad it is that there are so many mental health issues. So many people are not living normal, happy lives. Maybe to themselves, they are happy and feel fine and that’s great, at least. But when I imagine everything they could be doing and experiencing, the sadness is deep. Were their issues present since birth? What are their stories? Where are their parents? I have a lot of questions. Did they try anything when their kids were little? Did they just let the symptoms run their course? I can’t imagine what they all went through.

It’s hard to let anything run its course when dealing with autism. Sometimes you get brave and you try something, or you stop something. And then you wait. We have been on a supplement break for about three months to just give his body a little break and the medicine cabinet. We were emptying many different capsules into Gavin’s food for years. Now he really just takes things at random if I think of it, we give him B12 injections twice a week, and he takes CoQ10/L-carnitine liquid along with a leucovorin liquid twice a day. Since being diligent with just these things, his great improvement with sleep happened. Now with things so calm, we can slowly add in other things again and see what happens.

On top of all this, I worry about myself and my family. While we are okay now, what can we do now to protect our own mental health? I worry about getting older. I read that right now, about 50 million people suffer from dementia. There are children’s books now that tell kids how to deal with grandpa’s failing memory. Everyone says eat the Mediterranean diet, don’t drink out of aluminum cans, take fish oil, and exercise because the key is prevention. There has to be a bigger key than that. This is just too many people with dementia, and developing Alzheimer’s, the most common type of dementia.

I’m at the end of my story for today. While it feels like there is a lot of despair and disrepair in my post today overall, I promise I am happy and excited, although with a careful and watchful eye on all of my family. Gavin is doing great at ABA therapy and his sleep is so good. What more can I ask for right now? We are still on board to give him a stem cell injection, it will be next month instead after I take a trip back home to be with my parents for a few days.

Why I Unsubscribed from Autism News and Alerts

Today was the day. I just couldn’t see this subject in my inbox anymore. For exactly one year now, I had Google alerts set up for autism and a few other search terms relating to it. I also signed up for some newsletters, one being from the Autism Research Institute. I unsubscribed from them all today. I just need a break. Every single day I was looking through all of the news and bits of info about autism that I could handle. Until maybe I just couldn’t handle it anymore lately. The sadness from reading about how many kids are affected now, and the talk of research, research, research and ideas, ideas, ideas – yet parents can’t find doctors easily who know how to help their kids. We go through so much searching and trial and error, almost as if we have permanent blindfolds on.

I read a quote yesterday that felt exceptionally real. It was in a post in a Facebook group about trying to find the right diet, therapies and other interventions for autism and how every child reacts to changes differently.

“Healing autism is like fiddling with three dials on a radio in the dark. You don’t know what the dials are for or even what you are trying to do. But when you hit the dials just right, suddenly you hear music.”

So for the next six months, I promise myself to relax. Gavin is doing well in therapy, he is showing us new behaviors and interesting things every week. And we will be doing our first stem cell injection in April. If we hit another roadblock after that, then I’ll jump back into research.

But for now, we will continue what we have been doing and push through. We’ll focus on making Gavin listen, look and laugh. And taking him and Liam on adventures in the spring and through the summer will be the best. And we’ll be okay.

Where We Are and Where We Will Be

I haven’t posted in weeks now. When Gavin was in preschool I was pretty organized with this blog and keeping up with all changes, big and small. Since winter arrived, we all made it through both the gloomy, soul-searching days and the exciting, snowy days. Today I find the need to just push the words out through my fingertips and make sense of it all.

Gavin has been in ABA therapy more consistently now. Today actually starts the first day of a more solid schedule. One of his therapists left the center in December so January became an unpredictable month. Now he is back to going to ABA Monday through Thursday beginning at 9 AM and sometimes ending at noon or 3 PM. This is creating issues with his “nap cycle” as I feel like calling it. So we are dealing with that as things feel right, or wrong. The important thing is that his therapy is becoming more consistent. I know it’s all working for him when I see him clapping in the car and listening to us better.

But in other ways, he is not used to it all yet. He is scratching us at times and getting very frustrated. He wakes up in the middle of the night, sometimes almost screaming, and there’s nothing more hurtful for me right now than feeling depressed in those hours. And not just because of knowing how confused and upset Gavin feels and not knowing how to tell him it’s okay, and him resisting me holding him. It’s the overall feeling of the unknown future.

For each year that goes by, I could make a list of the different supplements we have tried, the results of blood tests we have ordered with a handful of different doctors, the notes I have of how long he slept, what he ate, and a picture of the still unsent boxes that contain urine tests and squishy gel packs that have never been frozen.

Gavin is four. Four. I cringed when it was almost time for Valentine’s Day. I knew there weren’t any special plans at the ABA center for the holiday. But I did know that at his preschool, if we was still going there, that he would come home with a paper heart and a pouch of Valentine’s. The lack of these little things crushes me inside. But lately I have to ask myself – is this important for me and our family to experience, or is it important to him? The truth is, it is not important to him. It’s selfish of me to even get sad about these things. Of course I want to experience all of these beautiful, sweet childhood moments just like I did with our oldest son. Of course I want them with Gavin too. But what is most important is getting to the bottom of everything else he is actually feeling. He is often frustrated and seems helpless. He stims and taps and hums and groans. His brain is misfiring. His immune system is overfiring. Gavin doesn’t need a pocket of Valentine’s cards, and I don’t either. We can get those Valentines when he is better and when he knows what they are. I need to help him be healthy, to be aware, and he needs more than ABA therapy. He needs a pocket of miracles.

Or an infusion of stem cells. Gavin is four and this is our year for it. I can’t wait any longer. I kept hoping that if took calcium pills for six months that he would stop poking his eyes so hard with his fingers that his eyelids flip inside out. I kept hoping that if he took fish oil and digestive enzymes and broccoli extract and silica drops and zinc picolinate and only had gluten free bread and only drank Fiji water, and gave him B12 injections, that his body would be functioning and clear and his brain would follow. It just isn’t happening. There’s also a chance that he might have PANS/PANDAS, or metal toxicity that needs detoxing and chelation, or bartonella, or lyme, or strep, or a continuous infection of some other kind, that a multitude of more expensive and stressful blood tests could find. Or we could just jump into an IV infusion of stem cells here in the US and just find out if we see any changes. Step one. Then we could get more infusions. Then if that actually miraculously works, we could look into extracting his own healing stem cells from his own bone marrow, at facilities in another country. It really sounds like another rabbit hole, but of a different kind. And this rabbit hole has the same foggy and mysterious map as all of the other things we have tried.

You cannot always wait for the perfect time, sometimes you must dare to jump.

Autism Life is Moving Along: Things We Did Today, Volume 4

Confession: This post is really, really late. Aah! It’s almost December but I never updated at the beginning of November.  It has been super busy and we have all been tired. The basic recap is:

  1. We have been healthy all month (luckily!) and no one has been sick in our family. This is the first November like that on record. Still in disbelief that we made it. (Of course, now worried about what December holds and downing the vitamins.)
  2. Our experience with our new ABA therapy center has been great so far and very timely. Gavin can start therapy on December 3.
  3. The ABA center wants Gavin to do an intensive schedule Monday through Thursday, even on Fridays too eventually. This means we had to pull him out of his preschool on Tuesday and Thursday morning. Tomorrow is his last day. This was a very hard decision. I love the teachers there, just as amazing and caring people foremost! I wanted Gavin to have the same kind of experience that his brother Liam had there. The truth is, the experience is not exactly the same. I cannot expect that to happen. They welcome Gavin to come back in the spring if he has a lot of success and if the center feels that he can skip Tuesdays and Thursdays and return to school on those days. I think right now Gavin will benefit more from therapy daily than going to preschool. The teachers there and the teachers from PPS agree. They have all made me feel much better about it all. I can’t thank them enough for all they do.
  4. I began this post saying that we have been tired. Gavin did have some sleeping issues throughout the month at times. I started giving him his B12 shot every night instead of every other night. That seems to have been a mistake because he did seem to be overstimulated by it. Then we received his new compounded injections with B12, folinic acid and NAC (N-Acetyl Cysteine). He has now been on a regular schedule of every other night with these injections and seems to be back to the way he was at the very beginning of November. He is calm, happy and sleeping great. Naps too. (They will end at some point, but not sure when! Let’s see how daily therapy effects him.)
  5. Gavin has been babbling more than ever again (I feel like I have been able to report that a lot over the past year) and loves going to speech therapy. ABA therapy will also cause changes to our speech therapy sessions which are normally at least twice a week. Our therapist, Dani, is also an awesome person we are lucky to be working with. She says we can still squeeze in Fridays with her at least if we can, and even though she normally doesn’t schedule sessions that day.

“You become. It takes a long time. That’s why it doesn’t happen often to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept.” – The Velveteen Rabbit

Tomorrow will be a big day with a lot of emotions. If Gavin is ready, I am. 🙂

Autism Mom Bloggers, Favorite Autism Blogs List

Autism Mom

This is one of the first sites I found a while back but sadly she will not be blogging any longer. I hope to read through all of the posts when I have free time. I love her gentle and calming writing style and I am sure many, many people will miss new posts from Elizabeth. One of her golden passages that I can’t forget: “Some days it takes everything I have to be patient. Some days I fail, and the shouting goes both ways. I am not very happy with myself on those days – I am the grown-up, I should do better and set the example. I sit back and think about what I could do differently. Maybe when he gets home from school he needs more of a break. Maybe we could schedule the putting away of the lunchbox and the chore for later, give him more time to decompress. Maybe that would ease his stress and reduce the arguing. Sometimes it is my failures that can be the best teachers. As long as I keep thinking and learning, I can keep supporting him every step of the way.”

Finding Cooper’s Voice

I think a lot of people know about Cooper’s mom, Kate, and their family’s journey. They went viral multiple times after all! Her blog is a good starting point to read through if you are just beginning the autism journey. She helps us all stay grounded through her writing which comes from her heart. A quote from Kate: “There is an element of grief that goes into raising a child with special needs. That statement offends some people while parents of kiddos with needs are nodding their heads. I was pregnant just like my friends. I pictured the future and raising my sweet little baby. Never once did I factor in having a child with severe needs. I pictured baseball games, funny conversations and bike riding — not doctor’s offices, IEP’s and communication devices. His diagnosis was shocking to me. I felt the need to grieve the little boy that I had pictured in order to accept the life I was given. My advice to parents is to give yourself time to accept your child’s diagnosis. You are human. Cut yourself some slack. And then you will be able to love the child that you have in an even stronger way.”

The Autism Dad

Some of the most useful and thought provoking posts I’ve read have been from an autism dad, not a mom! Rob’s site is full of thoughts and questions we have all had at some point. It’s comforting to find another person on the same page. Also we both have a son named Gavin, so that was interesting! From Rob: ” While reading, you will bear witness to all the raw emotions I’ve experienced along the way. You’ll experience our true happiness and utter heartbreak as life presents us with things that no child should ever have to face, or any family has to deal with. It’s raw, visceral, transparent and brutally honest. It’s our real-life story and we don’t hide from it. For almost a decade, people from across the globe have found comfort and solace in my thoughts because they put words to what they’ve been feeling.”

The Important Role of Magnesium in Autism (With Instructions For Success!)

It’s fall and as we become more cozy at home, I’m ready to get our troupe of supplements in the cabinet ready for winter as well. Since spending more time inside is on our horizon, it’s time to get things in order and maximize our results. So today I am thinking about one of our best friends: magnesium. Magnesium is a cofactor in more than 325 enzymatic reactions in DNA and neurotransmitters, in the bones, heart and brain, in every cell of the body. Many people have a deficiency in magnesium – not just kids or adults with autism. Plus, magnesium is needed for calcium and vitamin c metabolism. It’s essential for nerve and muscle functioning, and to convert blood sugar into energy. It’s a good idea for anyone to take a magnesium supplement each day since it’s a big part of the puzzle to balance the entire body. For kids with autism, you can take magnesium threonate (or multiple different forms of magnesium throughout the day or week, some say it can be a better effect) twice a day. At the moment, I prefer magnesium threonate? MIT researchers discovered and patented magnesium L-threonate based on its unique ability to boost brain levels of magnesium. You can also take magnesium citrate or a liquid mag twice a day to help with any constipation.

But the biggest help for a child is to take magnesium threonate each day along with B6, calcium and Vitamin D3 to increase absorption of magnesium in the cells.

It is also a good idea to take these supplements together along with a meal which contains carbohydrates to improve intestinal absorption.

Magnesium is the mind mineral. Some of the highest levels of magnesium in the body are found in the central nervous system, with studies dating back to the 1920s showing how crucial magnesium is for a balanced brain.

Magnesium is available in capsules which you can empty into food, or liquids and powders ready to add into food as well. It’s also easy to get capsules or liquids for B6, calcium and D3.

There are over 20 studies of vitamin B6 with magnesium for autism, including 12 double-blind, placebo-controlled studies, making it one of most studied treatments for autism. Almost all of these studies found that 45-50% of children and adults with autism benefited from high-dose supplementation of vitamin B6 with magnesium.

Magnesium in the diet
Foods high in saturated fat cause the body to get rid of magnesium. The cleaner your child’s diet, the more chance there is for minerals and nutrients to absorb and be a benefit to your child’s behavior. If you are taking supplements with a bad diet and poor digestion, you are wasting the power of the supplements.

Foods that are naturally rich in magnesium are:
Whole grains, beans and legumes, nuts and seeds, and dark leafy greens, as well as cocoa and molasses

Magnesium at bath time
For any child on the spectrum, bath time is a very important time of the day. It’s a time for the child to relax and get ready for bed. The water is a source of warmth and pressure around their body if they are sensory seeking. It’s also a place where they can feel relaxed and pay attention to playtime even better since they are in an enclosed space. While all of these good things are happening, you might as well make sure the water itself is playing a role in helping autistic symptoms. Here are recipes for bath soaks to help absorb magnesium into the body and to detox the body at the same time. Make sure the water is very warm when you add the ingredients to make a perfect bath.

1. Magnesium Bath: Bath soak with mag chloride flakes
1/2 cup magnesium chloride flakes
1/2 cup baking soda
1/2 cup himalayan pink salt or dead sea salts

2. Epsom Salt Bath: Detoxing bath soak
1 tablespoon of coconut oil
1/2 cup of epsom salt
3-5 drops of essential oils of your choice

During the bath, rub the skin with a washcloth all over to open the pores to allow more absorption.

It should go without saying, do not let your child drink the water.

You can alternate these baths during the week to help the body absorb magnesium more efficiently.

Topical magnesium on the body
Transdermal administration of magnesium bypasses processing by the liver. There are magnesium oil sprays and lotions. Many people say the best places to absorb lotions or sprays containing minerals are under the armpits and on the head.

Magnesium for sleep
There is a melatonin pathway in the body and magnesium helps its functionality to improve sleep naturally without having to ever take melatonin separately or other sleep aids. But the body also needs the right amounts of B6 and calcium to make melatonin production run more smoothly. It all starts to sound complex, but having the body in balance is the key. Once your child has the right balance, more processes in the body will start to come together better than ever, letting your child be more calm and learn better as they grow. Speaking of complexities, I should add finally that having tryptophan in the diet is also a good idea for helping any sleep issues, but you can add that after your magnesium/calcium/B6/D3 mission is on track and your child still struggles with staying asleep. B12 is also essential for so much in the body, including sleep patterns, which cannot fit into this post right now. Kids with autism usually always benefit from adding B12 in some way, at some point. But once magnesium is taken care of, B12 has a better chance of working as well, whether in a supplement, lozenge or injection. So with one step at a time, the balance can be found.

Different types of magnesium supplements explained:

The best forms:

Magnesium glycinate: This chelated form of magnesium tends to provide the highest levels of absorption and bioavailability, typically considered for those who are trying to correct a deficiency. It’s easily absorbed which makes it good for leaky gut.

Magnesium chloride / lactate: Contains 12 percent magnesium, but better absorption than others containing more. It’s great for detoxing and kidney function.

Magnesium malate: This is a highly absorbable form of magnesium that provides the benefits of this mineral, along with the benefits of malic acid, a nutrient found to contribute to the process of transforming food into ATP, the body’s energy source. Malic acid is a key component for creating energy in the body. This is great for low energy, fatigue and muscle pain.

Magnesium aspartate: Aspartate is combined with minerals and is available as copper aspartate, iron aspartate, magnesium aspartate, manganese aspartate, potassium aspartate, and zinc aspartate. Aspartates are used to increase absorption of the minerals they are combined with and to enhance athletic performance.

Magnesium taurate: This is a combination of magnesium and taurine, an amino acid. Together, they tend to provide a calming effect on your body and mind.

Magnesium orotate: This is created through the use of mineral salts of orotic acid. Orotates can penetrate cell membrane, enabled the effected delivery of the magnesium into the innermost layers of the cellular mitochondria and nucleus.

Magnesium threonate: Newer type of magnesium supplement penetrates the mitochondrial membrane.

The least helpful forms:

Magnesium sulfate / hydroxide: Milk of magnesia – used typically as a laxative.

Magnesium carbonate: Antacid properties, 45 magnesium.

Magnesium citrate: Magnesium with citric acid, laxative properties. This should not be used long term.

Magnesium oxide: This non-chelated magnesium is bound to an organic acid or a fatty acid. Contains 60 percent magnesium and has stool softening properties. Not a good choice for helping the body long term.

Obtaining Magnesium Through the Diet

Foods high in magnesium are:

  • almond
  • spinach
  • cashews
  • shredded wheat cereal
  • soy milk
  • black beans
  • edamame
  • peanut butter
  • whole grain bread
  • avocado

“Nutritionists in Canada find sunflower, squash and pumpkin seeds, black-eyed peas, tempeh, and Brazil nuts to be the richest sources of magnesium per serving.

Eating legumes, seeds, and grains won’t help as much as you’d expect since they also contain naturally occurring compounds called phytates that inhibit the absorption of minerals including magnesium.

Drink Magnesium-Rich Mineral Water

Another way to get more magnesium is to drink mineral water from natural springs.

Minerals waters have a long history of promoting health.

People around the world have been soaking in hot springs and drinking these waters for thousands of years.

Popular bottled brands include San Pellegrino, Perrier, Fuji, and Evian.

Gerolsteiner sparkling water from Germany is particularly high in magnesium.”

Magnesium Topically

Some say that the best way to get magnesium is through your skin. Besides baths with mag chloride flakes, you can also rub magnesium oil or lotion on your feet at night before bed.

Cofactors for Magnesium

B6 helps the liver work optimally and allows cells to absorb magnesium. Food based vitamin B can be from liver, raw bee pollen, and yeast flakes.

Baking soda helps magnesium reach the cells. Drink a 1/2 tsp or less of baking soda at night before bed or take baths with baking soda added.

Boron is found in prunes most of all. You can also take it in a supplement to help absorb magnesium.

Selenium is found in brazil nuts. It supports immunity and heart health.

Vitamin D and K2 must be taken as well to increase the absorption of magnesium. D is found in cod liver oil which everyone should take daily. K2 is found in natty, some cheeses, and can be supplemented.

Lastly, you need potassium. White potatoes with skin, lima beans, avocados and sweet potatoes have the highest amounts of potassium.

Quick Recap: What Magnesium Needs to Work
B6 vitamin B6 gets magnesium into cells…

There’s b6 in jigsaw srt https://www.amazon.com/Jigsaw-Magnes…/…/ref=as_sl_pc_tf_til… 

B6 is in local bee pollen, and if you can’t get local bee pollen, then:
Skakitch brand
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001LQXU8Q/ref=as_li_tl…

Bicarbonate  gets magnesium into mitochondria

Magnesium baths,
into which you add baking soda

Magnesium Water

The recipes for the bath &  mag water are here:
infantreflux.org/magnesium-for-the-littles/

Jigsaw magnesium powder has bicarbonate in it:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01L7Q4O3Y/ref=as_li_tl…

Boron keeps magnesium in cells

Prunes contain boron.

Adults 5-7 a day.

Boron drops

https://www.amazon.com/…/B001E…/ref=as_sl_pc_qf_sp_asin_til…

Boron is in mineral drops:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0028BW0IO/ref=as_li_tl…

How much magnesium do you need per day?
Take your weight in pounds and multiply x 5.
That number equals the total number of mgs of magnesium.

Autism, Vitamins, Supplements: The Basics for Healing Autism Symptoms

Fat Soluble Vitamins

There are four fat soluble vitamins, vitamin a, d, e and k. Fat soluble means they are easily stored in the body for long periods of time and generally pose a greater risk for toxicity when consumed in excess than water-soluble vitamins.

These are the amounts that a child 4 to 6 years old needs daily:

400mcg – Vitamin a
15 mcg – Vitamin d
7 mcg – Vitamin e
55 mcg – Vitamin k

Eating a normal, well-balanced diet will not lead to toxicity in otherwise healthy individuals. However, taking vitamin supplements that contain megadoses of vitamins A, D, E and K may lead to toxicity. The body only needs small amounts of any vitamin.

Water Soluble Vitamins

There are a total of nine water-soluble vitamins and these are the amounts a child 4 to 6 years old needs daily:

Thiamine B1: 0.6 mg
Riboflavin B2: 0.6 mg
Niacin B3: 8 mg
Vitamin B6: 0.6 mg
Vitamin B12: 1.2 mcg
Vitamin C: 25 mg
Biotin: 12 mcg
Pantothenic acid: 3 mg
Folate: 200 mcg

Water soluble means they travel freely through the body, and excess amounts are usually excreted by the kidneys.

B12

B12 is such a big deal it needs its own space here on the post. B12 supplements are not absorbed well in the stomach. b12 comes from animal sources naturally in dairy, meat and fish. the body does not produce any b12 on its own.

Vitamin B12 works well as adenosylcobalamin and 50% hydroxycobalamin, taken with the P-5-P version of B6 and methyl folate.

CoQ10

Fat soluble antioxidant present in the body, which can be additionally supplemented

CoQ10 is an antioxidant present naturally in the body, and it’s found most in the heart, kidney, liver and pancreas. CoQ10 is the only fat-soluble antioxidant your body produces on its own. CoQ10 has important functions in the body and because people with some diseases have reduced levels of this substance, supplements are a good idea. CoQ10 is vital vitamin-like nutrient that helps produce the energy that allows our bodies to function. Our cells need it for proper growth and maintenance. It is the vehicle that transports the electrons across the crucial energy production processes within our bodies.  CoQ10 is regarded as an essential nutrient for cell regeneration and supports a long, healthy and productive life. Even cardiologists now recommend CoQ10 supplements to all their patients more frequently than any other supplement, including Omega-3 / Fish Oil.

CoQ10 is endogenous to the human body – meaning that we produce it naturally and we all have it. From our vital organs, to every muscle in our bodies, we find CoQ10 in practically every cell. In fact, the names ubiquinone and ubiquinol (the two most common forms of CoQ10 found in our bodies) both derive from the Latin “ubiquitas” (modern day English: ubiquitous), which literally means “present everywhere”.

CoQ10 plays an important role in the production of 95% of the energy used by our bodies at the cellular level. This energy is generated by a complex series of chemical reactions that culminates in the production of Adenosine Triphosphate or ATP, which is the way in which our bodies store energy. Think of ATP as the equivalent of your car’s battery and CoQ10 as the cable that connects your car’s generator to that battery to keep it charged. Without CoQ10, your battery (ATP) will be quickly depleted and your body may cease to function properly.

Autism Life is Moving Along: Things We Did Today, Volume 3

It feels like my last post was not so long ago but a month has almost zapped by again. Life is basically going in the same direction and Gavin is doing great! The biggest change has been that we now give him a B12 injection every other night. This is definitely helping Gavin. We all think that because:

1) Although he is doing more therapy and school days now, which should make him tired, he didn’t fall asleep easily for naps or at night. He was probably going through a transition phase with all the new activity because it would take hours to fall asleep at times. But as of the past week, he is now falling asleep within 10 or 5 minutes no matter what kind of day he has had. I think this is because his body is more regulated because of the B12 saturation. (Wow, the B12 saturation? I’ll talk about that more later.)

2) He is smiling differently. His mouth is different. The way he uses his mouth is different. I read that B12 can cause the nerve signals in your mouth to have better pathways to the brain. He has been smiling extra big smiles where his top teeth show more than ever. He has let me put the toothbrush in his mouth during bath time for nearly two weeks now. He never let the toothbrush in before – he would always push it away. Now he will smile and even giggle when the brush touches his teeth or tongue. He doesn’t let me brush for very long or use toothpaste, but we are working on the sensory aspect of it. It’s coming along! Also he has been more mouthy, which is like a positive negative. His mouth is more awake which means he might almost bite us when he is excited, and he is putting more items in his mouth when he is playing, but it’s a sign of good things.

3) He has still been looking at my phone or watching some videos only occasionally. (Been using them as a reward to watch while I brush his teeth after breakfast and lunch.) I try to only let him use electronic devices after he is done eating, never during. Since beginning the shots, I think he is doing a better job of focusing on the books or activity while he eats. He also doesn’t get as upset when I take a device away. It’s like he has had enough and understands now that he will get it back again, at some point. All of this regulation must be from the B12. Gavin’s latest doctor told me that it’s not that we are treating him like he has a B12 deficiency but we are keeping his pathways saturated constantly by giving him shots every few days. He said eventually we can do daily. I’m still researching about all of it but so far it does seem safe. The B12 being injected subcutaneously allows the B12 to “leech” into the body 24/7. From this article: “The children who received the intervention treatment also saw increases in plasma methionine, decreases in S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (SAH), and improvements in the ratio of improvements in the ratio of S-adenosylmethionine to SAH. This indicated that the children who received methyl B12 saw improvements in cellular methylation capacity.” There’s a lot more to it than this and I’d like to write a post about it soon. The hardest thing about the shots? Giving them. At this point I do it by myself because if my husband or MIL are in the room with me, I feel more anxious when I am doing it. I don’t know why! But so far Gavin only noticed the shot a few times and jerked. Most of the time he doesn’t notice at all. I do it at night after bath time before putting on pajamas. He is usually standing listening to music on the Amazon Echo (distracted by pushing the buttons) and I give him a quick poke and then we finish getting ready.

4) His obsessions are stronger at times though. This is mostly a negative thing but interesting to see and figure out. Lately in parking lots he wants to physically touch the numbers painted on the concrete, or he wants to rub the numbers on license plates. Before I would just read them but now he is pointing them out and touching them constantly. He is usually upset and doesn’t want me to put him into the car because he wants to continue going around the parking lot looking at numbers and letters. This is the most upset that he gets lately: when it’s time to go home from therapy or school and he won’t let me pick him up. I have to wrangle him and get him into his seat. He still will grab me and my hair. During those times I get sad because every other piece of the puzzle is getting easier each day.

I am staying positive and strong. I have to in order to make sure Gavin gets everything he needs and to figure out what is next. It’s a never ending quest. There won’t be a way to flip a switch and have everything be “normal” for us. There have been so many times over the past four years that I wish for it to be different. How I wish that Gavin and Liam can play together normally. How I wish Gavin could have all of his frustrations erased.

I keep thinking about a quote I read about butterflies. It’s keeping me grounded.

We delight in the beauty of the butterfly, but rarely admit the changes it has gone through to achieve that beauty.
-Maya Angelou

Things about Gavin this month:

  • Has laughing fits and you can’t tell what was funny that made him laugh. But that laugh is the sound of pure joy, a laugh that is not held back or inhibited
  • Likes to watch the credits after a movie or a screensaver that is a clock or has words. It’s like things that are moving are addicting for the brain
  • Likes to watch videos of cars, trains, anything moving quickly without stopping – again with moving objects being addicting

Autism Life is Moving Along: Things We Did Today, Volume 2

It has been about a month since my last update and my goal is to keep these posts going. The past two weeks have been huge for Gavin. I think the theme of this period in our life is time. It has been time for a change and we have many. We are still not using the iPad and focusing on communicating better, especially while eating. Sometimes I have to give him my phone when he is just completely not happy or not eating at all (and I am running on empty), but it’s not often. It’s at the point now that if I accidentally leave my phone on a table and he sees it, he dashes for it, grabs it and runs full speed with it because he knows it’s his only chance to use it!

His eye contact is better than ever now and he listens so well. Is this because he is growing up or because he is just in our world consistently and not escaping to the iPad or phone often? Not sure but everything is good. You can always find Gavin sitting with books and exploring things in the real world, as it should be.

Gavin is now officially in preschool! All summer I didn’t know whether he was ready. I was nervous, scared, anxious. I didn’t want him to be uncomfortable, frightened, or mess up his sleeping schedule from being overwhelmed. Luckily our amazing teachers there welcomed us with open arms and told us there’s nothing to worry about. He goes twice a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9:30 to 12 and it’s perfect for him so far. Two teachers from the public school system’s early intervention (EI) are there with him and two other students who receive the services. It really is a perfect situation and I am so happy about it. Now is definitely the right time for him to be exposed to all of this.

We also got into a speech therapy schedule – every Wednesday at 10:30 for one hour. Our new therapist will not only help Gavin and build a relationship with him, but she will keep me on my toes. I have to make picture cards for Gavin and be consistent with having him communicate with them. So now I am more accountable and ready to do this. It’s time to add something new to our routine at home.

Keeping with my time theme – there was a big first time moment today. Gavin went down a slide at the playground about four times. He’s never done this before. It was very surreal and I couldn’t believe it was really happening. For a little backstory: Gavin never stays at a playground for very long. He is afraid of swings, most structures that are moving or make loud noises, and doesn’t climb on anything. We also have to take a water bottle with us so he can hold it in his mouth for most of the time (as a comfort) or one of his toys that plays music. Anything to keep him interested to stay there longer, because most of the time he would rather wander around the grounds or find his way back to our car. Today was different though. He was patient enough to go up and down the “hills” and use his legs to balance. Then when we were at the top of the slide, he let me put him on my lap. In the past he would wriggle and run away, or even have a small meltdown and almost cry, from being afraid. But not today. I don’t know if it was because he went to school lately, and went to a new place today as well (the speech therapy office), but he was not afraid of the slide. First we went down a few times together. A man who was there with his grandson was letting me know that Gavin had his eyes closed the first few times. But then he started opening them. And then – I put Gavin at the top and asked if he was ready to go, and I let him slide down by himself. I couldn’t believe he did it! Then I was able to take a video of the second time. On days like this I feel free of most of my worries. Relieved. Hopeful. Bright.

My only worry now is with fall coming in, and our rainy days, and the fact we will probably be sick a lot, is if I can continue keeping Gavin like this. Not being afraid, sleeping well, and going to school and speech therapy happily. We have to keep progressing and we just cannot afford to stop.

So far he is not napping well (or at all) and that causes issues. We are trying to figure out if it’s because of the change in his routine – but he is also waking up at night for hours at a time too. But we have to keep going with school and therapy because despite the lack of sleep, it seems to be helping him so much already. I am sure we can find out what to do – or maybe it will just take a few months of the new routine. But I am definitely not ready to drop naps. When he doesn’t take a nap, the end of the evening, and especially dinner, is much harder to get through. Naps regulate him for the rest of the day so much.